Application Tips for ENVI 5 – Exporting a Geospatial PDF

This is part of a series on tips for getting the most out of your geospatial applications. Check back regularly or follow HySpeed Computing to see the latest examples and demonstrations.

Objective: Utilize ENVI’s print and export options to generate a Geospatial PDF.

Geospatial PDF

Scenario: This tip utilizes a Landsat-8 scene of California’s Central Valley to demonstrate the steps for creating a Geospatial PDF using two different options: (1) using Print Layout; and (2) using Chip View to Geospatial PDF.

Geospatial PDFs allow you to easily share your geospatial output in standard PDF format while still enabling users to measure distances and identify locations in geographic coordinates, but without need for any specialized GIS or remote sensing software.

Option 1 – Print Layout

  • The Print Layout option requires ENVI 5.0 or later and works only on Windows platforms. It also requires that you launch ENVI in 32-bit mode and have a licensed ArcGIS application on the same system.
  • If you’re looking for the ENVI 32-bit mode (as opposed to the now standard 64-bit mode), it is typically found in either the ‘32-bit’ or ‘ENVI for ArcGIS’ subdirectory of the ENVI directory located under Start > All Programs.
  • Now, using your data of choice, prepare the active View in ENVI as you would like it to appear in the Geospatial PDF. In our example, we simply use a color infrared image of our example Landsat-8 scene. However, if desired, your output can include multiple layers and even annotations.
  • Once you are satisfied with the View, go to File > Print…, and this will launch the Print Layout viewer where you can make further adjustments to your output before exporting it to Geospatial PDF.
  • Note: If the File > Print… option doesn’t produce the desired output in Print Layout (which doesn’t directly support all file types, georeferencing formats or annotation styles), then you can also use File > Chip View To > Print… as another option. The Chip View To option creates a screen capture of whatever is in the active View, so it can accommodate anything you can display in a View, but with the tradeoff that there is slightly less functionality in the Print Layout format options.
  • In our example, for instance, the File > Print… option didn’t support the Landsat-8 scene when opened using the ‘MTL.txt’ file, but instead of using the Chip View To option, as a different workaround we resaved the scene in ENVI format to retain full functionality of Print Layout.
  • Once in the Print Layout viewer, you can apply different ArcMap templates, adjust the zoom level and location of the image, and edit features in the template. Here we made a few edits to the standard LetterPortrait.mxt template as the basis for our output.

ENVI Print Layout

  • To output your results to a Geospatial PDF, select the Export button at the top of the Print Layout viewer, enter a filename, and then select Save.
  • Note that Print Layout can also be used to Print your output using the Print button.
  • You have now created a Geospatial PDF of your work (see our example: CA_Central_Valley_1.pdf). Also, see below for tips on viewing and interacting with this file in Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat.

Option 1 – Chip View to Geospatial PDF

  • The Chip View to Geospatial PDF requires ENVI 5.2 or later, but does not require ArcGIS.
  • This option directly prints whatever is in the active View to a Geospatial PDF, so it has fewer options than the Print Layout option, but can still be very useful for those without an ArcGIS license.
  • As above, prepare the active View in ENVI as you would like it to appear in the Geospatial PDF, including multiple layers and annotations as desired. Here we again simply use a color infrared image of our example Landsat-8 scene, but this time include text annotations and a north arrow added directly to the View.
  • Once you are satisfied with the View, go to File > Chip View To > Geospatial PDF…, enter a filename, and then select OK.
  • Note that the Chip View To option can also be used to export your work to a File, PowerPoint or Google Earth.
  • Congratulations again. You have now created another Geospatial PDF of your work (see our example: CA_Central_Valley_2.pdf).

CA Central Valley 2

Viewing Output in Adobe

  • As mentioned, Geospatial PDFs allow you to measure distances and identify locations in geographic coordinates using a standard PDF format. Geospatial PDFs can be viewed in either Adobe Acrobat or Reader (v9 or later).
  • In Adobe Reader, the geospatial tools can be found under Edit > Analysis in the main menu bar. In Adobe Acrobat, the geospatial tools can be enabled by selecting View > Tools > Analyze in the main menu bar, and then accessed in the Tools pane under Analyze.
  • To measure distance, area and perimeter, select the Measuring Tool.
  • To see the cursor location in geographic coordinates, select the Geospatial Location Tool.
  • And to find a specific location, select the Geospatial Location Tool, right click on the image, select the Find a Location tool, and then enter the desired coordinates.

So now that you’re familiar with the basics of creating Geospatial PDFs, be sure to consider using them in your next project. They’re definitely a powerful way to share both images and derived output products with your colleagues and customers.

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