Live Webinar – Delivering On-Demand Geoanalytics at Scale

Join us for a live webinar
Tuesday, April 18, 2017 | 10:30am EDT/3:30pm BST

Register Now

Delivering On-Demand Geoanalytics at Scale

Things have changed. Vast amounts of imagery are freely available on cloud platforms while big datasets can be hosted and accessed in enterprise environments in ways that were previously cost prohibitive. The ability to efficiently and accurately analyze this data at scale is critical to making informed decisions in a timely manner.

Developed with your imagery needs in mind, the Geospatial Services Framework (GSF) provides a scalable, highly configurable framework for deploying batch and on-demand geospatial applications like ENVI and IDL as a web service. Whether you are a geospatial professional in need of a robust software stack for end-to-end data processing, or a decision maker in need of consolidated analytics for deriving actionable information from complex large-scale data, GSF can be configured to meet your needs.

This webinar will show you real-world example applications that:

  • Describe the capabilities of GSF for scalable data processing and information delivery
  • Introduce the diverse ecosystem of geospatial analysis tools exposed by GSF
  • Illustrate the development of customized ENVI applications within the GSF environment

What are your geospatial data analysis needs?

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If you can’t attend the live webinar, register anyways and we’ll email you a link to the recording.

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HICO Image Processing System – Update

(14-Dec-2016) Please pardon the interruption. The HICO Image Processing System is currently being migrated to another hosting platform and will be back up and running soon. Stay tuned here for an announcement once the maintenance is complete. Thank you.

HICO IPS

ENVI Analytics Symposium 2016 – Geospatial Signatures to Analytical Insights

HySpeed Computing is pleased to announce our sponsorship of the upcoming ENVI Analytics Symposium taking place in Boulder, CO from August 23-24, 2016.

EAS 2016

Building on the success of last year’s inaugural symposium, the 2016 ENVI Analytics Symposium “continues its exploration of remote sensing and big data analytics around the theme of Geospatial Signatures to Analytical Insights.

“The concept of a spectral signature in remote sensing involves measuring reflectance/emittance characteristics of an object with respect to wavelength. Extending the concept of a spectral signature to a geospatial signature opens the aperture of our imagination to include textural, spatial, contextual, and temporal characteristics that can lead to the discovery of new patterns in data. Extraction of signatures can in turn lead to new analytical insights on changes in the environment which impact decisions from national security to critical infrastructure to urban planning.

“Join your fellow thought leaders and practitioners from industry, academia, government, and non-profit organizations in Boulder for an intensive exploration of the latest advancements of analytics in remote sensing.”

Key topics to be discussed at this year’s event include Global Security and GEOINT, Big Data Analytics, Small Satellites, UAS and Sensors, and Algorithms to Insights, among many others.

There will also be a series of pre- and post-symposium workshops to gain in-depth knowledge on various geospatial analysis techniques and technologies.

For more information: http://harrisgeospatial.com/eas/Home.aspx

It’s shaping up to be a great conference. We look forward to seeing you there.

The Panama Canal from Space – A collection of satellite images before and after the Expansion Project

In commemoration of completion of the Panama Canal Expansion Project, and in tribute to the upcoming official opening on June 26, we present a series of before and after satellite photos highlighting the Expansion Project and showcasing this engineering marvel.

Work on the Panama Canal Expansion took nearly 9 years to complete, starting in September 2007, at a cost of US$5.2 billion. By adding a third set of locks on both the Pacific and Caribbean sides of the canal, dredging the existing navigation channel, adding a new approach channel on the Caribbean side and a new 6.1 km access channel on the Pacific side, and raising the Gatun Lake maximum operating level, the Expansion doubles the capacity of the Canal and significantly increases the size of vessels that can transit the Canal.

Below we present before and after satellite images of the newly expanded Canal, provide an overview of the Expansion Project, show a rare nearly-cloudless image from Landsat-5, and even include one of the earliest Landsat images of the Panama Canal acquired by Landsat-1 on March 18, 1973.

Panama Canal Expansion - Pacific

Satellite views of the Pacific Ocean entrance to the Panama Canal, before (left; Landsat-7 on November 20, 2002) and after (right; Landsat-8 on June 11, 2016) the Expansion Project. Note the addition of the third set of locks, the three sets of water reutilization basins immediately adjacent to the new locks, and the new access channel that now bypasses Miraflores Lake.

 

Panama Canal Expansion - Caribbean

Satellite views of the Caribbean Sea entrance to the Panama Canal, before (left; Landsat-7 on May 28, 2002) and after (right; Landsat-8 on February 20, 2016) the Expansion Project. Note the addition of the third set of locks, the three sets of water reutilization basins immediately adjacent to the new locks, and the new approach channel.

 

Overview - Panama Canal Expansion Project

An overview of the Panama Canal Expansion Project (from: http://micanaldepanama.com/expansion/).

 

Panama Canal - Landsat5 Cloud Free

This is a rare nearly-cloudless glimpse of the entire Panama Canal acquired by Landsat-5 on March 27, 2000.

 

Panama Canal - Landsat1

For the remote sensing history aficionados, this is the earliest Landsat image of the Panama Canal listed in the USGS archives, from Landsat-1 on March 18, 1973, over 40 years ago.

Constellations, Clouds & the Conundrum of Big Data Processing

HySpeed Computing is proud to be featured in the inaugural issue of UPWARD, the quarterly magazine of the ISS National Lab.

UPWARD

Constellations, Clouds & the Conundrum of Big Data Processing

“For millennia, humans have looked up to the sky to find constellations of stars, wondering what mysteries they hold. Today, we live in a world where constellations of satellites look down on us, hoping to unravel mysteries as well – by capturing highly complex images of Earth.

“In the commercial remote sensing market, the imaging of Earth from space has experienced a technical tsunami, giving rise to a population explosion of smaller but far more capable satellites with new sensing and communication capabilities. In the near future, constellations of nano-, micro-, and other small-sats will swarm low Earth orbit like drones filling the skies on Earth.”

See the full article beginning on page 10…

Conundrum of Big Data Processing

2015 ISS R&D Conference – Evolution or Revolution

The 2015 International Space Station Research & Development Conference (ISS R&D) took place recently in Boston, MA from July 7-9.

It was an amazing week of insights and information on the innovations and discoveries taking place on board the ISS, as well as glimpses of the achievements yet to come.

2015 ISS R&D

A highlight of the first day was a conversation with Elon Musk, who mused on his initial commercial forays into space, the state of his transformative company SpaceX, and a view of his vision for the future of space travel, research and exploration.

Core topics discussed at ISS R&D 2015 included everything from biology and human health, to materials development and plant science, to remote sensing and Earth observation, to space travel and human exploration. Here are a few of the top highlights:

  • NASA and its partner agencies have transitioned from assembling an amazingly complex vehicle in space to now utilizing this vehicle for the benefit of humanity.
  • The feat of building and maintaining the International Space Station is often underrated and overlooked, but it’s an incredible achievement, and everyone is encouraged to explore the marvels of what has been, and continues to be, accomplished.
  • We are advancing to a future where space transport will become commonplace, and it is the science, humanitarian, exploration and business opportunities that will be the new focus of ISS utilization.
  • The ISS is an entrepreneur engine, as evidenced in part by the rise of the new space economy. For example, new markets are emerging in the remote sensing domain, with NanoRacks, Teledyne Brown Engineering and Urthecast all making investments in expanding Earth observation from the ISS.
  • The future of the ISS, and its continued operation, is a direct function of the success or failure of what is happening on the ISS right now. The greater the success, the brighter the future.

Throughout the week a question was often asked whether the ISS is evolutionary or revolutionary… and in the end the answer was both!

Interested in learning more about the ISS? Visit the recently launched website  spacestationresearch.com to “explore the new era of science in space for life on Earth”.

Also, save the data for next year’s conference, which is taking place July 12-14, 2016 in San Diego, California. See you there!

“Space is now closer than you think.”

From here to there – and everywhere – with Geospatial Cloud Computing

Reposted from Exelis VIS, Imagery Speaks, June 30, 2015, by James Goodman, CEO HySpeed Computing.

In a previous article we presented an overview of the advantages of cloud computing in remote sensing applications, and described an upcoming prototype web application for processing imagery from the HICO sensor on the International Space Station.

First, as a follow up, we’re excited to announce availability of the HICO Image Processing System – a cloud computing platform for on-demand remote sensing image analysis and data visualization.

HICO IPS - Chesapeake Bay - Chlorophyll

HICO IPS allows users to select specific images and algorithms, dynamically launch analysis routines in the cloud, and then see results displayed directly in an online map interface. System capabilities are demonstrated using imagery collected by the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) on the International Space Station, and example algorithms are included for assessing coastal water quality and other nearshore environmental conditions.

This is an application-server, and not just a map-server. Thus, HICO IPS is delivering on-demand image processing of real physical parameters, such as chlorophyll concentration, inherent optical properties, and water depth.

The system was developed using a combination of commercial and open-source software, with core image processing performed using the recently released ENVI Services Engine. No specialized software is required to run HICO IPS. You just need an internet connection and a web browser to run the application (we suggest using Google Chrome).

Beyond HICO, and beyond the coastal ocean, the system can be configured for any number of different remote sensing instruments and applications, thus providing an adaptable cloud computing framework for rapidly implementing new algorithms and applications, as well as making these applications and their output readily available to the global user community.

However, this is but one application. Significantly greater work is needed throughout the remote sensing community to leverage these and other exciting new tools and processing capabilities. To participate in a discussion of how the future of geospatial image processing is evolving, and see a presentation of the HICO IPS, join us at the upcoming ENVI Analytics Symposium in Boulder, CO, August 25-26.

With this broader context in mind, and as a second follow-up, we ask the important question when envisioning this future of how we as an industry, and as a research community, are going to get from here to there?

The currently expanding diversity and volume of remote sensing data presents particular challenges for aggregating data relevant to specific research applications, developing analysis tools that can be extended to a variety of sensors, efficiently implementing data processing across a distributed storage network, and delivering value-added products to a broad range of stakeholders.

Based on lessons learned from developing the HICO IPS, here we identify three important requirements needed to meet these challenges:

  • Data and application interoperability need to continue evolving. This need speaks to the use of broadly accessible data formats, expansion of software binding libraries, and development of cross-platform applications.
  • Improved mechanisms are needed for transforming research achievements into functional software applications. Greater impact can be achieved, larger audiences reached, and application opportunities significantly enhanced, if more investment is made in remote sensing technology transfer.
  • Robust tools are required for decision support and information delivery. This requirement necessitates development of intuitive visualization and user interface tools that will assist users in understanding image analysis output products as well as contribute to more informed decision making.

These developments will not happen overnight, but the pace of the industry indicates that such transformations are already in process and that geospatial image processing will continue to evolve at a rapid rate. We encourage you to participate.

About HySpeed Computing: Our mission is to provide the most effective analysis tools for deriving and delivering information from geospatial imagery. Visit us at hyspeedcomputing.com.

To access the HICO Image Processing System: http://hyspeedgeo.com/HICO/

Astronaut Photography – Your access to stunning views from space

Astronauts have busy schedules in space – system operations, maintenance, repairs, science experiments – but did you know they also acquire hundreds of photos during each mission?

Reid Wiseman , Astronaut Photography

From stunning views of Earth’s natural features to glimpses of your favorite city at night, and from pure artistry to applied science, these photos offer a remarkable perspective of our planet’s surface as well as a valuable historical record of how and where our planet is changing.

There are now two great resources available for viewing this photography:

Both websites provide access to thousands of photos, are free to use, allow users to search photos or browse by category, and even provide options to download images for your own use (but be sure to read through the conditions of use on both websites).

We’ve spent countless hours browsing through these stunning image collections, and encourage you to take a look for yourself.

We hope you enjoy!

Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth

“The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth hosts the best and most complete online collection of astronaut photographs of the Earth from 1961 through the present. This service is provided by the International Space Station program and the JSC Earth Science & Remote Sensing Unit, ARES Division, Exploration Integration Science Directorate.” – http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/

Windows on Earth

“Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station.  Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach.  The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth. The site is operated by TERC, an educational non-profit, in collaboration with the Association of Space Explorers (the professional association of flown astronauts and cosmonauts), the Virtual High School, and CASIS (Center for Advancement of Science in Space).” – http://www.windowsonearth.org/

Windows on Earth featured

HICO Image Gallery – Looking beyond the data

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What’s in an image? Beyond the visual impact, beyond the pixels, and beyond the data, there’s valuable information to be had. It just takes the right tools to extract that information.

With that thought in mind, HySpeed Computing created the HICO Image Processing System to make these tools readily available and thereby put image processing capabilities directly in your hands.

The HICO IPS is a prototype web application for on-demand remote sensing image analysis in the cloud. It’s available through your browser, so it doesn’t require any specialized software, and you don’t have to be a remote sensing expert to use the system.

HICO, the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean, operating on the International Space Station from 2009-2014, is the first space-based imaging spectrometer designed specifically to measure the coastal environment. And research shows that substantial amounts of information can be derived from this imagery.

To commemorate the recent launch of the HICO IPS and celebrate the beauty of our coastal environment, we’ve put together a gallery highlighting some of the stunning images acquired by HICO that are available in the system.

We hope you enjoy the images, and encourage you to explore the HICO IPS web application to try out your own remote sensing analysis.

HICO IPS: Chesapeake Bay Chla

To access the HICO Image Processing System: http://hyspeedgeo.com/HICO/

For more information on HICO: http://hico.coas.oregonstate.edu/

Innovations and Innovators in Space – Elon Musk to speak at upcoming ISS R&D Conference 2015

Join us at ISS R&D 2015 – the International Space Station Research & Development Conference taking place in Boston, MA from July 7-9 – to connect with game-changing scientists and other experts who are driving innovation through space research.

This year’s featured keynote speaker is Elon Musk – transformative entrepreneur and space visionary – who will be taking the stage on Tuesday July 7 to share “his thoughts on enabling a new era of innovators through space exploration and the International Space Station.”

Elon Musk Keynote Speaker - ISS R&D 2015

Core topics to be discussed at ISS R&D 2015 include Biology and Medicine, Human Health in Space, Commercialization and Nongovernment Utilization, Materials Development, Plant Science, Remote Sensing/Earth and Space Observation, Energy, STEM Education, and Technology Development and Demonstration.

Are you new to space research? If so, see how space can you elevate your research! There’s a New User Workshop being held on Monday July 6 before the conference begins to introduce interested users to the benefits of conducting research in microgravity and utilizing the ISS for Earth observation.

For more information on the conference: http://www.issconference.org/

We look forward to seeing you there.